accidentalambience: rooftop farming..,

an idea that needs to develop and expand… direct to consumer food practices need to reemerge!

Seriously thinking about an impactful pledge on plastic unconsumption. Ideas?

roguesquid: RogueSquid says: “The Great Pacific Garbage Patch - Many people believe that this is an island of trash that one can walk upon, but it is much worse. There are five (5) gyres in the world’s oceans that contain immense areas of floating garbage. It creates a vortex that sucks the trash together, ranging from present day garbage to trash from 20 to 30 years ago! Including toys from the 1980’s which would be considered vintage today - Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle toys, Computer Monitors, 35-Millimeter film caps, etc. Check out Plastic Paradise the movie to learn more.”


Resources:
1. Mackenzie Mount - Sierra Club Issue May/June 2014

More ugly food illustration

More ugly food illustration

Giving ugly foods a chance. They digest the same.
dothegreenthing: Eat Uglier by Harriet Stansall
Illustrator Harriet Stansall serves up a second poster for her ‘Eat Ugly’ campaign against food waste, which inspires shoppers and supermarkets to look beyond the aesthetics of fresh produce and buy it on the basis of taste.
“I wanted to make a series of posters about food waste that reflect the influence of propaganda/beauty campaigns,” says Harriet. "This is a campaign to show that fruit and veg come in all shapes and sizes, and that we should look past their unfortunate looks and take pride in picking the ugly vegetables up off the supermarket shelves. In doing so, we can minimise mindless food-wasting”
Why?
61% of Brits are concerned about the environmental impact of our food and groceries when we shop, but that doesn’t stop us picking only the most perfect peaches. Our choosiness means supermarkets like Tesco have to source more produce than we could physically eat to put on a nice display, which resulted in a fifth of their fruit and vegetables going to waste last year. Bad news for greenhouse gas levels, food miles, packaging, pesticides and water use.
How?
Not only do we fuss over which fruits are the most shiny and shapely when buying them, we’re also extremely wasteful when it comes to eating them, throwing out almost an entire meal a day and wasting £60 a month. Give ugly fruit and veg a chance, and don’t bin it once you’ve bought it.

Giving ugly foods a chance. They digest the same.

dothegreenthingEat Uglier by Harriet Stansall

Illustrator Harriet Stansall serves up a second poster for her ‘Eat Ugly’ campaign against food waste, which inspires shoppers and supermarkets to look beyond the aesthetics of fresh produce and buy it on the basis of taste.

“I wanted to make a series of posters about food waste that reflect the influence of propaganda/beauty campaigns,” says Harriet. "This is a campaign to show that fruit and veg come in all shapes and sizes, and that we should look past their unfortunate looks and take pride in picking the ugly vegetables up off the supermarket shelves. In doing so, we can minimise mindless food-wasting”

Why?

61% of Brits are concerned about the environmental impact of our food and groceries when we shop, but that doesn’t stop us picking only the most perfect peaches. Our choosiness means supermarkets like Tesco have to source more produce than we could physically eat to put on a nice display, which resulted in a fifth of their fruit and vegetables going to waste last year. Bad news for greenhouse gas levels, food miles, packaging, pesticides and water use.

How?

Not only do we fuss over which fruits are the most shiny and shapely when buying them, we’re also extremely wasteful when it comes to eating them, throwing out almost an entire meal a day and wasting £60 a month. Give ugly fruit and veg a chance, and don’t bin it once you’ve bought it.

Dumpster dived goods

diggingtrash: This makes me so happy! These dumpsterdived oranges, clementines, limes and blood oranges are my breakfast for today. They are so beautifull and nutritious only to be thrown away? Hell no!

abcworldnews: American families throw away up to $2,200 worth of food every year.

abcworldnewsAmerican families throw away up to $2,200 worth of food every year.

Lifestyle change, check!
This Eco-Savvy Rebel is an upbeat eco machine in training! From upcycling projects to tackling the world of eco food, Kimmy goes about auditing and learning how we can have a green balanced life!